Clara Barton, philanthropist

  Clarissa “Clara” Harlowe Barton, is one of the most honored women in American history. Her contributions in education, during the Civil War, and at The Red Cross made a difference in the lives of an untold number of people. Clara began teaching at age 18, founded a school for the children of mill workers, and established the first free school in Bordentown, New Jersey when she was 31. She […]

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Game On – Book Review

If you have never read a Stephanie Plum novel, you should! They are funny, upbeat, and irreverent and will keep you entertained from the very first sentence. Who is Stephanie Plum you ask? Well, she is a sassy bond enforcement agent for her sleazy cousin Vinnie’s  bail bond business in Trenton, New Jersey. She is in one scape after or another, but is always rescued by her police detective boyfriend, […]

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Katherine Stinson, Aviator

Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [reproduction number, e.g., LC-B2-1234] I don’t enjoy flying—well, actually sitting in an airplane while somebody else flies it is problematic. There’s something about hurtling through the air locked in a metal box that freaks me out. Call me crazy. So when I read about Katherine Stinson, who was clearly unafraid to fly, it duly impressed me. At 19, she became one of the […]

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The Christie Affair – Book Review

I know a book is going to be good when it begins like this: “A long time ago, in another country, I nearly killed a woman. It’s a particular feeling, the urge to murder. It takes over your body so completely, it’s like a divine force, grabbing hold of your will, your limbs, your psyche. There’s a joy to it. In retrospect, it’s frightening, but I daresay in the moment […]

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My Favorite Book of January 2022

Amanda Dykes knocked it out of the park with Whose Waves These Are. The story is so beautiful it changed me. It inspired me. It made me weep. Her book made me feel warm inside and her words were medicine for my weary soul. I could feel God in them. And her writing is gorgeous; lyrical and sweeping. I like to highlight passages when I read for later reflection, but […]

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The Greatest Women in History – Marie Curie

Photo by Henri Manuel, Public Domain March is Women’s History Month here in the United States of America, a time when we can collectively celebrate women’s contributions to American history. It began in 1978 as a week-long celebration in Santa Rosa, California, and a consortium of women’s groups and historians successfully lobbied for national recognition the following year. It took until 1987, but now every March is designated Women’s History […]

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The Last Thing He Told Me – Book Review

Owen Michaels, a coder for a prominent tech company, vanishes just before his boss is arrested for corruption. He leaves two things behind: A duffle bag full of cash for his 16-year-old daughter, Bailey, and a cryptic note to Hannah, his beloved wife of one year: Protect her. Hannah quickly realizes her husband isn’t who he said he was. Despite their complicated relationship, Hannah and Bailey set out to discover the […]

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Painting the Light – Book Review

Martha’s Vineyard, 1898. In her first life, Ida Russell was a painter, who confidently walked the halls of Boston’s renowned Museum School, enrolling in art courses that were once deemed “unthinkable” for women to take, and showing a budding talent for watercolors. Now she is Ida Pease, resident of a seaside sheep farm and wife to Ezra. Cold and distant, Ezra often leaves her to run the farm while he […]

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December 2021 Reads

So, I only got through seven books in December, but in my defense, I have four great excuses for my lack of production:  Coming in at well over nine hundred pages, Go Tell the Bees That I am Gone counts for at least two books;  I had a wicked stomach bug for a week;  Grammies have gifts to buy;  Jesus is the reason for the season.   Go Tell the […]

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The Flying Scotsman

When I think of runner Eric Liddell, I envision young men running on the beach to beautiful instrumental music in the 1981 Oscar winning film Chariots of Fire. What made his story so powerful wasn’t his athletic prowess during the 1924 Olympics, though, it was what happened after the Games. Eric Liddell was born in 1902 to a missionary family in Tientsin, Qing China. He and his elder brother, Rob, […]

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